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The second meeting of the Arctic Council's Arctic Shipping Best Practices Information Forum will take place 14-15 May 2018 in London. Invitations to this meeting with additional details will be sent by early March.

The purpose of the Arctic Shipping Best Practice Information Forum is to support effective implementation of the IMO’s Polar Code by making publicly available on a dedicated web portal information relevant to all those involved in safe and environmentally sound Arctic shipping, including vessels owners/operators, regulators, classification societies, marine insurers, and indigenous and local communities.

Agenda details and registration to be confirmed.

See also:

voyage planning


CHAPTER SUMMARY
This chapter is designed to ensure that the company, master and crew are provided with sufficient information to enable operations to be conducted with due consideration to the safety of ships and persons on board and, as appropriate, environmental protection. These considerations  need to be referenced in the Polar Waters Operational Manual. By way of example they include, but are not limited to, issues such as Notices to mariners that are ordinarily contained in government publications.

SUBMISSIONS

United States of America National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)


NOAA website

Subbmission #1

Link:  http://www.natice.noaa.gov/
Rationale: The USNIC Daily Ice Edge product depicts the daily sea ice pack (8-10/10ths or greater of sea ice), and the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ). The marginal ice zone is the transition between the open ocean (ice free) and pack ice. The MIZ is very dynamic and affects the air-ocean heat transport, as well as being a significant factor in navigational safety. The daily ice edge is analyzed by sea ice experts using multiple sources of near real time satellite data, derived satellite products, buoy data, weather, and analyst interpretation of current sea ice conditions. The product is a current depiction of the location of the ice edge vice a satellite derived ice edge product.
Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. / This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Topic: Ice-data
Updates: Daily

Submission #2
Link:  https://www.nauticalcharts.noaa.gov/nsd/coastpilot_w.php?book=9
Rationale: "The United States Coast Pilot® consists of a series of nautical books that cover a variety of information important to navigators of coastal and intracoastal waters and the Great Lakes. Issued in nine volumes, they contain supplemental information that is difficult to portray on a nautical chart. Coast Pilot 9 - 35th Edition, 2017 covers the Pacific and Arctic coasts of Alaska from Cape Spencer to the Beaufort Sea."
Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Topic: Hydrography
Updates: Daily

The International Hydrographic Organization)

 To be inserted

World Wildlife Fund)

 To be inserted

Nunavut Planning Commission)

 To be inserted

The Nautical Institute)

 To be inserted

World Meteorological Organization)

 To be inserted

International Ice Charting Working Group)

 To be inserted

University of Bremen)

 To be inserted

Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI))

 To be inserted

The Danish Arctic Research Institution)

 To be inserted

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC))

 To be inserted

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

 To be inserted

Canadian Hydrographic Service)

 To be inserted






administration 1 participants 1










CHAPTER 11 – VOYAGE PLANNING: Full Polar Code text
As adopted from IMO - Full Polar Code text

11.1 Goal

The goal of this chapter is to ensure that the Company, master and crew are provided with sufficient information to enable operations to be conducted with due consideration to safety of ship and persons on board and, as appropriate, environmental protection.

11.2 Functional requirement
In order to achieve the goal set out in paragraph 11.1 above, the voyage plan shall take into account the potential hazards of the intended voyage.

11.3 Requirements
In order to comply with the functional requirement of paragraph 11.2 above, the master shall consider a route through polar waters, taking into account the following:
  • .1 the procedures required by the PWOM;
  • .2 any limitations of the hydrographic information and aids to navigation available;
  • .3 current information on the extent and type of ice and icebergs in the vicinity of the intended route;
  • .4 statistical information on ice and temperatures from former years;
  • .5 places of refuge;
  • .6 current information and measures to be taken when marine mammals are encountered relating to known areas with densities of marine mammals, including seasonal migration areas;
  • .7 current information on relevant ships' routing systems, speed recommendations and vessel traffic services relating to known areas with densities of marine mammals, including seasonal migration areas;
  • .8 national and international designated protected areas along the route; and
  • .9 operation in areas remote from search and rescue (SAR) capabilities.

POLAR CODE CHAPTERS
  • Chapter 1: General
  • Chapter 2: Polar Water Operation Manual
  • Chapter 3: Ship structure
  • Chapter 4: Subdivision and stability
  • Chapter 5: Watertight and weathertight integrity
  • Chapter 6: Machinery installations
  • Chapter 7: Fire safety/Protection
  • Chapter 8: Life saving appliances and arrangements
  • Chapter 9: Safety of navigation
  • Chapter 10: Communication
  • Chapter 11: Voyage planning
  • Chapter 12: Manning and training
  • Polar Code Part IB:
    • Additional Guidance Regarding the Provisions of the Introduction and Part I-A
  • Polar Code Part IIA: Pollution Prevention Measures
    • Chapter 1: Prevention of Pollution by Oil
    • Chapter 2: Control of pollution by noxious liquid substances in bulk
    • Chapter 4: Prevention of pollution by sewage from ships
    • Chapter 5: Prevention of pollution by garbage from ships
  • Polar Code Part II B:
    • Additional Guidance Regarding the Provisions of the Introduction and Part II-A





birdThis site includes graphics related to marine litter in the Arctic, produced by PAME or others.

The most visible effect of pollution on marine organisms is the entanglement of wildlife in marine litter. The photo on the right was taken by H. Gladier (birdimagency.com).

Studies have shown that millions of animals that live in the oceans are debilitated, mutilated and killed by marine litter every year. Marine litter can be transported by ocean currents over long distances, and is found in all marine environments, even in remote areas in the open oceans and the deep sea.



Arctic Marine Litter Graphics
All use is allowed and is encouraged, but please source by providing a link to this site or cite the producer (PAME).

litter beachSource: International Coastal Cleanup Report 2017 (Ocean Conservancy).



Which Plastic Float


































Source: GRID-Arendal (Maphoto/Riccardo Pravettoni) - The graphic has been remade by PAME.




Composition of waste 1





Source: What a Waste (2012) - The World Bank.




Other Sources

deadliest

what




Plastic pollution reaching record levels in once pristine Arctic (BBC video)
Plastic waste is increasing in the supposedly pristine wilderness of the Arctic.Scientists say almost everywhere they have looked in the Arctic Ocean, they’ve found plastic pollution. In the northern fjords of Norway, one man is on a mission to pick up as much plastic as he can. 

Link to video:
Screen Shot 2018 02 08 at 15.28.59





industry guidelines


ABOUT

(Intro text written by topic lead)
The first chapter.......


SUBMISSIONS

Submission 1)

To be inserted

Submission 2)

 To be inserted

Submission 3)

 To be inserted

Submission 4)

 To be inserted

Submission 5)

 To be inserted


administration 1 participants 1











1.1 Structure of this part

Each chapter in this part consists of the overall goal of the chapter, functional requirements to fulfil the goal, and regulations. A ship shall be considered to meet a functional requirement set out in this part when either:
  • .1 the ship's design and arrangements comply with all the regulations associated with that functional requirement; or
  • .2 part(s) or all of the ship's relevant design and arrangements have been reviewed and approved in accordance with regulation 4 of SOLAS chapter XIV, and any remaining parts of the ship comply with the relevant regulations.
1.2 Definitions
In addition to the definitions included in the relevant SOLAS chapters and the introduction of this Code, the following definitions are applicable to this part.
  • 1.2.1 Bergy waters mean an area of freely navigable water in which ice of land origin is present in concentrations less than 1/10. There may be sea ice present, although the total concentration of all ice shall not exceed 1/10. 
  • 1.2.2 Escort means any ship with superior ice capability in transit with another ship.
  • 1.2.3 Escorted operation means any operation in which a ship's movement is facilitated through the intervention of an escort.
  • 1.2.4 Habitable environment means a ventilated environment that will protect against hypothermia.
  • 1.2.5 Icebreaker means any ship whose operational profile may include escort or ice management functions, whose powering and dimensions allow it to undertake aggressive operations in ice-covered waters.
  • 1.2.6 Ice Class means the notation assigned to the ship by the Administration or by an organization recognized by the Administration showing that the ship has been designed for navigation in sea-ice conditions.
  • 1.2.7 Maximum expected time of rescue means the time adopted for the design of equipment and system that provide survival support. It shall never be less than 5 days.
  • 1.2.8 Machinery Installations means equipment and machinery and its associated piping and cabling, which is necessary for the safe operation of the ship. MEPC 68/21/Add.1 Annex 10, page 11 https://edocs.imo.org/Final
  • 1.2.9 Mean Daily Low Temperature (MDLT) means the mean value of the daily low temperature for each day of the year over a minimum 10 year period. A data set acceptable to the Administration may be used if 10 years of data is not available.
  • 1.2.10 Polar Class (PC) means the ice class assigned to the ship by the Administration or by an organization recognized by the Administration based upon IACS Unified Requirements.
  • 1.2.11 Polar Service Temperature (PST) means a temperature specified for a ship which is intended to operate in low air temperature, which shall be set at least 100C below the lowest MDLT for the intended area and season of operation in polar waters.
  • 1.2.12 Ship intended to operate in low air temperature means a ship which is intended to undertake voyages to or through areas where the lowest Mean Daily Low Temperature (MDLT) is below -100C.
  • 1.2.13 Tankers mean oil tankers as defined in SOLAS regulation II-1/2.22, chemical tankers as defined in SOLAS regulation II-1/3.19 and gas carriers as defined in SOLAS regulation VII/11.2.
  • 1.2.14 Upper ice waterline means the waterline defined by the maximum draughts forward and aft for operation in ice.

1.3 Certificate and survey
  • 1.3.1 Every ship to which this Code applies shall have on board a valid Polar Ship Certificate.
  • 1.3.2 Except as provided for in paragraph 1.3.3, the Polar Ship Certificate shall be issued after an initial or renewal survey to a ship which complies with the relevant requirements of this Code.
  • 1.3.3 For category C cargo ships, if the result of the assessment in paragraph 1.5 is that no additional equipment or structural modification is required to comply with the Polar Code, the Polar Ship Certificate may be issued based upon documented verification that the ship complies with all relevant requirements of the Polar Code. In this case, for continued validity of the certificate, an onboard survey should be undertaken at the next scheduled survey.
  • 1.3.4 The certificate referred to in this regulation shall be issued either by the Administration or by any person or organization recognized by it in accordance with SOLAS regulation XI-1/1. In every case, that Administration assumes full responsibility for the certificate.
  • 1.3.5 The Polar Ship Certificate shall be drawn up in the form corresponding to the model given in appendix 1 to this Code. If the language used is neither English, nor French nor Spanish, the text shall include a translation into one of these languages.
  • 1.3.6 Polar Ship Certificate validity, survey dates and endorsements shall be harmonized with the relevant SOLAS certificates in accordance with the provisions of regulation I/14 of the SOLAS Convention. The certificate shall include a supplement recording equipment required by the Code.
  • 1.3.7 Where applicable, the certificate shall reference a methodology to assess operational capabilities and limitations in ice to the satisfaction of the Administration, taking into account the guidelines developed by the Organization.
1.4 Performance standards
  • 1.4.1 Unless expressly provided otherwise, ship systems and equipment addressed in this Code shall satisfy at least the same performance standards referred to in SOLAS.
  • 1.4 2 For ships operating in low air temperature, a polar service temperature (PST) shall be specified and shall be at least 100C below the lowest MDLT for the intended area and season of operation in polar waters. Systems and equipment required by this Code shall be fully functional at the polar service temperature.
  • 1.4.3 For ships operating in low air temperature, survival systems and equipment shall be fully operational at the polar service temperature during the maximum expected rescue time.
1.5 Operational assessment
In order to establish procedures or operational limitations, an assessment of the ship and its equipment shall be carried out, taking into consideration the following:
  • .1 the anticipated range of operating and environmental conditions, such as:
    • .1 operation in low air temperature;
    • .2 operation in ice;
    • .3 operation in high latitude; and
    • .4 potential for abandonment onto ice or land;
  • .2 hazards, as listed in section 3 of the Introduction, as applicable; and
  • .3 additional hazards, if identified.


all topics









general header final
ABOUT

(Intro text written by topic lead)
The first chapter.......


SUBMISSIONS

Submission 1)

To be inserted

Submission 2)

 To be inserted

Submission 3)

 To be inserted

Submission 4)

 To be inserted

Submission 5)

 To be inserted


administration 1 participants 1











1.1 Structure of this part

Each chapter in this part consists of the overall goal of the chapter, functional requirements to fulfil the goal, and regulations. A ship shall be considered to meet a functional requirement set out in this part when either:
  • .1 the ship's design and arrangements comply with all the regulations associated with that functional requirement; or
  • .2 part(s) or all of the ship's relevant design and arrangements have been reviewed and approved in accordance with regulation 4 of SOLAS chapter XIV, and any remaining parts of the ship comply with the relevant regulations.
1.2 Definitions
In addition to the definitions included in the relevant SOLAS chapters and the introduction of this Code, the following definitions are applicable to this part.
  • 1.2.1 Bergy waters mean an area of freely navigable water in which ice of land origin is present in concentrations less than 1/10. There may be sea ice present, although the total concentration of all ice shall not exceed 1/10. 
  • 1.2.2 Escort means any ship with superior ice capability in transit with another ship.
  • 1.2.3 Escorted operation means any operation in which a ship's movement is facilitated through the intervention of an escort.
  • 1.2.4 Habitable environment means a ventilated environment that will protect against hypothermia.
  • 1.2.5 Icebreaker means any ship whose operational profile may include escort or ice management functions, whose powering and dimensions allow it to undertake aggressive operations in ice-covered waters.
  • 1.2.6 Ice Class means the notation assigned to the ship by the Administration or by an organization recognized by the Administration showing that the ship has been designed for navigation in sea-ice conditions.
  • 1.2.7 Maximum expected time of rescue means the time adopted for the design of equipment and system that provide survival support. It shall never be less than 5 days.
  • 1.2.8 Machinery Installations means equipment and machinery and its associated piping and cabling, which is necessary for the safe operation of the ship. MEPC 68/21/Add.1 Annex 10, page 11 https://edocs.imo.org/Final
  • 1.2.9 Mean Daily Low Temperature (MDLT) means the mean value of the daily low temperature for each day of the year over a minimum 10 year period. A data set acceptable to the Administration may be used if 10 years of data is not available.
  • 1.2.10 Polar Class (PC) means the ice class assigned to the ship by the Administration or by an organization recognized by the Administration based upon IACS Unified Requirements.
  • 1.2.11 Polar Service Temperature (PST) means a temperature specified for a ship which is intended to operate in low air temperature, which shall be set at least 100C below the lowest MDLT for the intended area and season of operation in polar waters.
  • 1.2.12 Ship intended to operate in low air temperature means a ship which is intended to undertake voyages to or through areas where the lowest Mean Daily Low Temperature (MDLT) is below -100C.
  • 1.2.13 Tankers mean oil tankers as defined in SOLAS regulation II-1/2.22, chemical tankers as defined in SOLAS regulation II-1/3.19 and gas carriers as defined in SOLAS regulation VII/11.2.
  • 1.2.14 Upper ice waterline means the waterline defined by the maximum draughts forward and aft for operation in ice.

1.3 Certificate and survey
  • 1.3.1 Every ship to which this Code applies shall have on board a valid Polar Ship Certificate.
  • 1.3.2 Except as provided for in paragraph 1.3.3, the Polar Ship Certificate shall be issued after an initial or renewal survey to a ship which complies with the relevant requirements of this Code.
  • 1.3.3 For category C cargo ships, if the result of the assessment in paragraph 1.5 is that no additional equipment or structural modification is required to comply with the Polar Code, the Polar Ship Certificate may be issued based upon documented verification that the ship complies with all relevant requirements of the Polar Code. In this case, for continued validity of the certificate, an onboard survey should be undertaken at the next scheduled survey.
  • 1.3.4 The certificate referred to in this regulation shall be issued either by the Administration or by any person or organization recognized by it in accordance with SOLAS regulation XI-1/1. In every case, that Administration assumes full responsibility for the certificate.
  • 1.3.5 The Polar Ship Certificate shall be drawn up in the form corresponding to the model given in appendix 1 to this Code. If the language used is neither English, nor French nor Spanish, the text shall include a translation into one of these languages.
  • 1.3.6 Polar Ship Certificate validity, survey dates and endorsements shall be harmonized with the relevant SOLAS certificates in accordance with the provisions of regulation I/14 of the SOLAS Convention. The certificate shall include a supplement recording equipment required by the Code.
  • 1.3.7 Where applicable, the certificate shall reference a methodology to assess operational capabilities and limitations in ice to the satisfaction of the Administration, taking into account the guidelines developed by the Organization.
1.4 Performance standards
  • 1.4.1 Unless expressly provided otherwise, ship systems and equipment addressed in this Code shall satisfy at least the same performance standards referred to in SOLAS.
  • 1.4 2 For ships operating in low air temperature, a polar service temperature (PST) shall be specified and shall be at least 100C below the lowest MDLT for the intended area and season of operation in polar waters. Systems and equipment required by this Code shall be fully functional at the polar service temperature.
  • 1.4.3 For ships operating in low air temperature, survival systems and equipment shall be fully operational at the polar service temperature during the maximum expected rescue time.
1.5 Operational assessment
In order to establish procedures or operational limitations, an assessment of the ship and its equipment shall be carried out, taking into consideration the following:
  • .1 the anticipated range of operating and environmental conditions, such as:
    • .1 operation in low air temperature;
    • .2 operation in ice;
    • .3 operation in high latitude; and
    • .4 potential for abandonment onto ice or land;
  • .2 hazards, as listed in section 3 of the Introduction, as applicable; and
  • .3 additional hazards, if identified.


all topics